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I think people over complicate things sometimes. Bounce the bottom, go fast, go slow, yank it up a couple times.... when fish start biting keep doing what your doing until fish stop biting... then, try it all again....
 

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Personally from my experience I'm jogging with a salty, i do a few consecutive Bottom bounces, lifting 6 inches or so for each. Then lift a foot or 2 up, and back to bottom. Followed by a slow lift to around 6 inches again. Hold fold for 20-30 seconds. Then repeat until i get a hit or seriously interested Mark. Then adapt accordingly.

Spoons or cranks is another story. All depends on my mood to start and adapt according to response.

I'll also usually dead stick one line 4-6" off bottom to start.
 

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Overall when fishing a lake I'd say I have most luck when I have a jig on bottom with salty and a small trout hook about 8 inches up with minnow head.

Tap the bottom with the jig and then leave still for a minute or two.

On the red a few weeks ago I had better luck with this setup then anyone but left jig on bottom, was using a bigger top hook with half minnow, caught all on top hook including a MA.

When its clear and I can use the camera I'll sometimes put a spinner on bottom and then lift up to the hole and let it drop to bottom. Seems like fish see that shimmer from a long distance and come in. Then i'll just lightly vibrate the line just enough for the top hook to jitter and once they commit leave it still.
 

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My preferred style is finese jigging for less active or neutral fish rather than seeking out the more agressive fish. I try to experiment and adapt to the ever changing mood of the fish and conditions. IMO, varying your jigging technique often makes a huge difference! Specifically, varying your jigging cadence, lift and drop height and speed, and duration of pauses will definately trigger more bites. On the river, I will usually start off with slow high lifts and even slower drops with longer pauses at the top and bottom of the stroke. Most hits occur at the pause on the top of the jigging stroke. On the lake, I will start with very short and abrupt lifts and drops but raised off bottom. Usually, when you get them to raise off bottom, they will commit. Sometimes, just twitching is better. Some days, they won't touch it unless you tease them or make them chase. There are days that fish don't respond well to noise, and rattle cranks will actually spook rather than attract them.
 

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I try to experiment and adapt to the ever changing mood of the fish and conditions. IMO, varying your jigging technique often makes a huge difference!
Some days, cadence is everything.

Quite often, anglers think in terms of "what are you using? what color", when we should be asking--did that last fish hit on the pause? near bottom? did you snap it then let it sit? I've had days where if you jigged the jig, they'd hardly bite....had to let it sit right on bottom, then they'd come slurp it up from the bottom....I hate that. However, we went from thinking there were no fish there (rocky current area where marking fish is difficult) to having some really good action.

Now add that not everyone only fishes Greenbacks. There's techniques on LOTW that very consistently catch Walleye, that won't catch much on Big Windy. They generally just want the bait to move differently. One of the things I love most about fishing is figuring out where they are and what are eating.

So much of jigging is finding what those particular fish you're floating over want....and then replicating that, until you've worn that pod of fish out and it's time to go find another pod.
 
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