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I am considering purchasing tracks for my artic cat 700. I have heard mixed reviews about them. Just looking for some input from anyone on here who has tracks on their quad. And no I don’t wasn’t a sled. Thanks in advance
 

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From what I’ve read on the Cat forum I follow there is mixed reviews and also suggestions. Don’t expect your quad to be a speed demon anymore. You will lose a lot of top end. A few have recommended clutch kits. Putting tracks on is like adding much larger tires. You can get kits or some guys have removed 4 of the 8 rollers in the primary. Some have said not all tracks are good in all terrains. They can be hard on axles, ball joints and other suspension components. I’m pretty sure you can view posts in that forum. Do an advanced search on tracks but pick the ATV section otherwise you’ll get thousands of posts in the sled section. It’s arcticchat.com.
 

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I bought a set last winter for my 700 cat. So far I’m really happy with them.
Top speed took a beating but normally I’m towing my ice fishing sleigh or grooming the local cross country ski trailanyways so I’m not wanting to open it up and cruise. Typically run in low gear.
A sled is convenient because it fits in your truck box, I have to trailer the quad everywhere because it doesn’t fit between my wheel wells

also, one less motor to maintain in adding tracks to an existing atv

hope this helps
 

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I ran tracks for 15 years on a 700 KQ and a 700 Grizz (same tracks, just changed adapters for each brand). Many thousands of Km's on them,

Plus's:
  • can tow heavy loads with ease.
  • they float on top of snow in most conditions
  • they are geared down, so easier to turn and amazing 'torque'
  • basically on lake ice/snow they are unstoppable most of the time. I studded my tracks for extra grip when towing.

Negatives:
  • They kick up snow - a lot. I put rubber mats cut to fit the wheel wells front and back to prevent snow buildup in engine compartment as well as rear brakes. Without snow guards, in cold weather, you must clear the snow from the undercarriage/fan/engine area/A-arms and especially the boots before it freezes - so stop bike, then clean off/out snow. If you don't, you may pop fan fuses or blow the fan/rad (I did), or, if it ices up your axle boots, they may rip when you drive away (I replaced mine quite a few times)
  • can do a self install, I did half the time, but they are heavy and you need to set your toe properly or they are a PITA to ride.
  • geared down means you lose 30-50% of your speed depending on brand
  • suspension usually freezes solid minutes into your ride in cool weather.
  • Did I mention they throw snow?
  • I would not consider unless I had a heated garage to park it in and melt the snow, or, go to car wash after every trip and wash the snow out.
  • when you get stuck in real deep soft snow, or spring melt snow, you are stuck, real good. Make sure you have a good winch and straps and such, and a plan for if you get stuck in waste deep snow or buried in slop on the lake.
I broke a few axles too. Got real good at swapping them out.

They are great when you have a place to keep the bike warm and happy.


Tips
Carry spare nuts and bolts and appropriate wrenches with you - I three times threw a track off, and had to fix in the middle of nowhere. Know how to do that.
Carry a spare belt and know how to change it - they have a LOT of torque.
Carry a booster pack if you don't have a pull start.
Carry a spare axle with both boots ($200) - and know how to swap.
Keep an eye on sliders/bogeys for wear and tear. It happens very fast.

Want some advice from a guy that has spent more hours on a tracked Quad than most? If you have the means, get a good sled.
 

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I ran tracks for 15 years on a 700 KQ and a 700 Grizz (same tracks, just changed adapters for each brand). Many thousands of Km's on them,

Plus's:
  • can tow heavy loads with ease.
  • they float on top of snow in most conditions
  • they are geared down, so easier to turn and amazing 'torque'
  • basically on lake ice/snow they are unstoppable most of the time. I studded my tracks for extra grip when towing.

Negatives:
  • They kick up snow - a lot. I put rubber mats cut to fit the wheel wells front and back to prevent snow buildup in engine compartment as well as rear brakes. Without snow guards, in cold weather, you must clear the snow from the undercarriage/fan/engine area/A-arms and especially the boots before it freezes - so stop bike, then clean off/out snow. If you don't, you may pop fan fuses or blow the fan/rad (I did), or, if it ices up your axle boots, they may rip when you drive away (I replaced mine quite a few times)
  • can do a self install, I did half the time, but they are heavy and you need to set your toe properly or they are a PITA to ride.
  • geared down means you lose 30-50% of your speed depending on brand
  • suspension usually freezes solid minutes into your ride in cool weather.
  • Did I mention they throw snow?
  • I would not consider unless I had a heated garage to park it in and melt the snow, or, go to car wash after every trip and wash the snow out.
  • when you get stuck in real deep soft snow, or spring melt snow, you are stuck, real good. Make sure you have a good winch and straps and such, and a plan for if you get stuck in waste deep snow or buried in slop on the lake.
I broke a few axles too. Got real good at swapping them out.

They are great when you have a place to keep the bike warm and happy.


Tips
Carry spare nuts and bolts and appropriate wrenches with you - I three times threw a track off, and had to fix in the middle of nowhere. Know how to do that.
Carry a spare belt and know how to change it - they have a LOT of torque.
Carry a booster pack if you don't have a pull start.
Carry a spare axle with both boots ($200) - and know how to swap.
Keep an eye on sliders/bogeys for wear and tear. It happens very fast.

Want some advice from a guy that has spent more hours on a tracked Quad than most? If you have the means, get a good sled.
Great write up! Makes me glad I have a sled.
 

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I ran tracks for 15 years on a 700 KQ and a 700 Grizz (same tracks, just changed adapters for each brand). Many thousands of Km's on them,

Plus's:
  • can tow heavy loads with ease.
  • they float on top of snow in most conditions
  • they are geared down, so easier to turn and amazing 'torque'
  • basically on lake ice/snow they are unstoppable most of the time. I studded my tracks for extra grip when towing.

Negatives:
  • They kick up snow - a lot. I put rubber mats cut to fit the wheel wells front and back to prevent snow buildup in engine compartment as well as rear brakes. Without snow guards, in cold weather, you must clear the snow from the undercarriage/fan/engine area/A-arms and especially the boots before it freezes - so stop bike, then clean off/out snow. If you don't, you may pop fan fuses or blow the fan/rad (I did), or, if it ices up your axle boots, they may rip when you drive away (I replaced mine quite a few times)
  • can do a self install, I did half the time, but they are heavy and you need to set your toe properly or they are a PITA to ride.
  • geared down means you lose 30-50% of your speed depending on brand
  • suspension usually freezes solid minutes into your ride in cool weather.
  • Did I mention they throw snow?
  • I would not consider unless I had a heated garage to park it in and melt the snow, or, go to car wash after every trip and wash the snow out.
  • when you get stuck in real deep soft snow, or spring melt snow, you are stuck, real good. Make sure you have a good winch and straps and such, and a plan for if you get stuck in waste deep snow or buried in slop on the lake.
I broke a few axles too. Got real good at swapping them out.

They are great when you have a place to keep the bike warm and happy.


Tips
Carry spare nuts and bolts and appropriate wrenches with you - I three times threw a track off, and had to fix in the middle of nowhere. Know how to do that.
Carry a spare belt and know how to change it - they have a LOT of torque.
Carry a booster pack if you don't have a pull start.
Carry a spare axle with both boots ($200) - and know how to swap.
Keep an eye on sliders/bogeys for wear and tear. It happens very fast.

Want some advice from a guy that has spent more hours on a tracked Quad than most? If you have the means, get a good sled.
I have spent hours reviewing different forums and articles, none of which were as informative and truthful as this post. Thanks Chris!
 
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